Archives

086194
Users Today : 262
This Month : 975
This Year : 48301
Total Users : 75930
Views Today : 1318
Total views : 370867
Your IP Address : 44.192.114.32
Server Time : 2022-07-04

Rizalyn

PARENTS AWARENESS ABOUT DENGUE

Researcher: Jake N. Fabian

INTRODUCTION

Dengue Fever (DF) and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) are endemic in the Philippines.  The biggest recorded epidemic in the Philippines occurred in 1996 in Metro Manila with a morbidity rate of 28 / 100,000 and a mortality rate of 0.7/100,000. DHF cases are increasing with the average 5 – year morbidity in 1979 to 1983. 1984 to 1988 and 1989 to 1993 were 1.54/100,000, 3.85/100,000 and 12.12/100,000, respectively. In 1998, nearly 32,000 cases and 500 deaths were reported from all regions, the over-all case fatality rate was 2%.

Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease of public health significance. Its geographic distribution includes more than 100 countries worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that more than 2.5 Billion people are at risk of dengue infection. As per estimate, over 50 million infections with about 400,000 cases of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) are reported annually which is a leading cause of childhood mortality in several Asian countries. Affecting mostly children, the case fatality rates range from less than 1% to 10%.

According to the National Epidemiology Center (NEC) – Department of Health (DOH), 3,771 cases of Dengue Fever has been reported since April 2005. The country has reached its epidemic threshold in January and February this year.

Since 1998, as part of the national government’s thrust to control Dengue epidemics, DOH has initiated Community clean-up operations. Public information campaigns have been launched. Most notable of the government’s aggressive campaign is the launching of the “Four o’clock Habit” which mobilizes the communities and schools to clean their environment every 4:00 PM.

But despite these initiatives by the Philippine government, Dengue remains to be an important cause of pediatric admission. Much needs to be done in finding effective strategies for behavior change of the community toward dengue. Since prevention and early recognition are important in decreasing morbidity and mortality, the knowledge, attitude and practices of parents are important factors to be evaluated.

Download File

Pregnancy in Women with Physical Disability

The WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION defines the term DISABILITY as a consequence of impairments, activity

limitations, participation restrictions, and environmental factors.

In relation to the article Pregnancy in Women with Physical Disability (Smeltzer, 2007), I would rather focus my concern sharing my ideas on women with physical disabilities as to their needs, problems and concerns not only during pregnancy but also during labor and delivery and also after childbirth or during puerperium/postpartum.

In general, women with physical disabilities are stereotyped, forgetting that the reproductive stage that they too are endowed with the capacity to be impregnated, able to carry the products of conception for the whole duration to full term, can go through the process of childbirth and can accept and perform the new roles and responsibilities of a mother beginning at puerperium/postpartum.

Health Care Providers who are not familiar with the health care needs of this group of women should take into consideration the important issues and experiences of these women.

Health care for women with disabilities related to pregnancy, childbearing and puerperium should start with effective and appropriate communication.  Communication addressed and care rendered to women with disabilities should be empowering, strengthens their abilities and should boost their morale for emotional stability.

As mentioned by Misra, Grasen, and Weisman (2000) “women with disabilities should receive preconception counseling to make sure that they are in the healthiest condition giving emphasis on nutritional status, weight control, cessation of smoking and alcohol use, and treatment of any active symptoms or secondary conditions related to disability.”

During the period of Pregnancy Cycle, Santiago (2002); and Nasek et. al., (1977) had identified some barriers which prevent women with disabilities from obtaining prenatal care suitable and appropriate for their condition.  Health Care Providers should take the efforts to improve rendered prenatal care amidst their disabilities so that these pregnant women with disabilities can receive care in a comfortable and dignified manner.  Negative attitudes of Health Care Providers and lack of physical access to equipment of the facility and environments ranked number one among the barriers; hence this serves as an awakening on the part of the Health Care Providers.

Like other women, those with disabilities are often anxious and concerned about the labor and delivery process they are about to experience.  Assessment and care rendered to these patients should not warrant the safety and well-being of a woman and her baby and evaluation and decisions of type of care based on the assessment obtained should be based on sound obstetric indications rather than the mere presence of a disability.

Necessary care during the puerperium/postpartum period rendered to women with disabilities may require longer period of stay in the hospital.  Easy access to her infant should be made possible as suggested by Carty (1998) and Madorsky (1995) for the purpose of establishing feelings of fulfillment on the part of the mother.  Other new roles and responsibilities should be well explained and words of encouragement should be given especially so with breastfeeding providing all the necessary assistance and guidance for these women with disabilities to gain independence in caring for their infants.

Smeltzer’s (2007) concludes that nurses aim to be holistic in their approach to the patients in their care.  Thus, women with disabilities who are pregnant or considering pregnancy should expect that the holistic approach be extended to them, and that clinicians will welcome their legitimate claim to be parents and provide them care and support through their pregnancies, during the labor and delivery processes and the postpartum period.#

By Mrs. Phoebe Bacayana

Director, Reproductive Health Care Center

Aldersgate College

A Design Prototype Automatic Transfer Switch for Nueva Vizcaya Provincial Operating Room

Author: Bose, Ronnel C,
Purisima, Rolando M. Jr.
Duclan, Jimmy A.
Adviser: Mr. Angelito G. Capuno
Degree: BSEE

The study is an applied research that deals on the design of an Automatic Transfers Switch intended for the consumption of NVPH Operating Room.

The study was conducted to promote & create cheaper and reliable alternative methods of having Automatic Switch Transfer (ATS). Currently ATS available in the market are expensive that only few institutions can afford. This study will allow establishments enjoy uninterrupted power supply at the least possible cost.

A Solar Gadget to Power Small Appliances Unit

Authors: De Guzman, Jayson O.
Molinar, Julius M.
Ovaguir, Edmund S.
Adviser: Angelito G. Capuno
Degree: BSEE
Abstract:

With the worldwide clamor for alternative sources of electric power, this study has been conceived. The solar gadgets have the capacity of 14 w capable of supplying a 14 cu. Feet two door refrigerator. The project at current price with initiates cost Php 43,275.00 per unit and a payback period of 6-7 years.

Use of Biomass Residues as Low-Cost and Viable Alternative Solution of Wastewater Treatment System Design of a Septic Vault

Researcher: Ferdinand H. Marcos

Graduate Degree: MEP-CE

Abstract:

This research study aims to solve sanitation problems and environmental pollution due to the contamination of groundwater using a low cost system, which consists of digestive and leaching chambers having infiltrators by the use of biomass residues (e.g., rice hull, coal, waste wood and coconut coir dust).

The researcher discussed the properties and the components of these biomass residues which are capable of removing wastewater pollutants. Design and construction of this environment-friendly septic vault is also being properly presented. Related literature and studies has also been used and presented for correlation.

An Assessment of the Implementation of the English Speaking Program of Aldersgate College:

Researcher:      Marissa J. Taguinod

Background of the Study

Globalization has brought innumerable changes in political socio-economic and linguistic aspects of human existence. English has undeniably reached a stature so great that it can now be called without doubt as the world language – the dominant language in this globalized village. A good command of the English language therefore will help keep one updated and abreast of the times, thereby enabling him to join the stream of world culture and also making him a citizen of the world because English is an international language.

However, studies and tests show an operation which reveal that there is a continuous deterioration in the English language proficiency of Filipino second language speakers in the academic world. In this purview, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo issued Executive Order No. 210 establishing the policy to strengthen the use of the English language as a medium of instruction in the educational system. Among the provisions of this EO are: to develop the aptitude, competence and proficiency of our students in the English language to maintain and improve their competence edge particularly in the use of Information and Communications Technology (ICT); to improve the entire educational system, particularly in the training of educators and the provision of borrowed materials and resources.

There are several factors that affect the performance of students in the use of English in their classes. One big factor as the researcher believes is the proficiency of the teaching personnel like instructors, professors, teachers themselves who are expected to be competent in the use of the English language. Another factor may be non-teaching personnel themselves who are indifferent in the use of English in communicating with the teachers and students. Still another factor is the use of strategies, methods, approaches and classroom activities.  It is for these reasons that they like to be updated and to keep abreast of newer trends and methodologies.

Considering the vital role that the institution plays in the development of students especially on the acquisition of knowledge and levels in the English language as tools in communication, the school launched a long term program thrusts sometime in 2002 with teacher- performance targets geared to academic excellence, and positive work attitudes. One of the eight thrusts which is projected to be attained by the year 2004 onwards is 100% English Speaking faculty members, office personnel, administrators and students from which the researcher was encouraged to conduct a study on the assessment of the Implementation of the English Speaking Program of Aldersgate College. The researcher believes that the results would pave the way for improvement of English instruction in the different factors affecting students’ performance in English, and the improvement of communication between teaching, non-teaching personnel and the students.

Download File

PERCEPTUAL LEARNING STYLE PREFERENCES OF GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Researcher: Marivic C. Manalese

ABSTRACT

The study is entitled “Perceptual Learning Style Preferences of General Chemistry Students in Aldersgate College”. Generally, the objective of the study was to determine the perceptual learning style preferences of the freshmen nursing students of Aldersgate College. Specifically, this study attempted to determine the profile of the freshmen nursing students of Aldersgate College in terms of gender, occupation of parents and type of high school graduated from; find out the perceptual learning style preferences of the General Chemistry students in terms of the elements of auditory, tactile, visual, and kinesthetic; find out the level of performance of the respondents in General Chemistry; determine the significant relationship between the students’ profile and their perceptual learning style preferences in General Chemistry; and determine the significant relationship between the level of performance in General Chemistry and the perceptual learning style preferences of the respondents.

The study employed the descriptive-correlation research method where the respondents’ profiles were correlated to their perceptual learning style preferences. The perceptual learning style preferences of the respondents were also correlated to their level of performance in Chemistry.

The respondents of the study were the General Chemistry students of Aldersgate College, Solano, Nueva Vizcaya and were subjected to tools that were used in this study such as Perceptual Learning Style Preferences Questionnaire (PLSPQ), which determined their score in four elements- auditory, tactile, visual, kinesthetic, and the Personal Information Questionnaire (PIQ), which determined the profile of the respondents such as gender, occupation of parents and type of High School graduated from.

The research instruments used in this study are the PLSPQ adapted from Dunn and Dunn Learning Style Questionnaire, copyright by Joy Reid and the PIQ to determine whether gender, occupation of parents and type of High School graduated from relate to perceptual learning style preferences. The items in the PLSPQ were scored in the following manner: 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 for strongly agree, agree, undecided, disagree and strongly disagree respectively. The weighted mean and average weighted mean were computed to determine the perceptual learning style preferences of the respondents. To determine the Level of Performance in General Chemistry of the respondents, the descriptive equivalent of their final grade was used. In the Personal Information Questionnaire, the responses of the respondents were grouped for comparative analyses.

The study yielded that seventy one and sixty seven hundredths percent (71.67%) are female; thirty eight and thirty three hundredths percent (38.33%) of the respondents father are agricultural, animal husbandry, forestry workers and fishermen and twenty one and sixty seven hundredths percent (21.67%) of the mothers are either professionals, technical and related workers, managerial, executive and administrative workers or production process workers, transport equipment operator, laborers or housewives. Seventy five percent (75%) of the respondents graduated from public high schools; and twenty five percent (25 %) graduated from private high schools. Eighty three and thirty three hundredths percent (83.33%) had satisfactory level of performance and sixteen and sixty seven hundredths percent (16.67%) of the respondents had very satisfactory level of performance in General Chemistry.

The auditory learning style, Rank 1 with a weighted mean of 3.75 followed by visual learning style, Rank 2 with a weighted mean of 3.65 with slight difference on kinesthetic learning style, Rank 3 with a weighted mean of 3.64. The tactile learning style, Rank 4 with a weighted mean of 3.57, and interpreted as Agree.

There is no significant relationship between the profile and the perceptual learning style preferences of the General Chemistry students.

There is no significant relationship between the level of performance in General Chemistry and the perceptual learning style preferences of the respondents.

Download File

Common Errors in Composition Writing of BSN Freshmen

Background of the Study

Writing has helped transform the world.  Revolutions have been started by it. Oppression has been toppled by it. Writing, however, has enlightened the human condition according to The National Commission on Writing in America’s Schools and Colleges (2003). Our own history is richer because of writers who kept the Filipino spirit awake and vigilant from the time of the Spanish regime to the period of American domination, and the fifteen – year period of martial law. Armed only with a pen, these writers have changed the course of Philippine history by striking the patriotic cords of the heroes we remember to have actively joined in a united front against the imperialists. Today, modern writers continue to echo voices from the past as they remain vanguards of the Filipino nation amidst current issues and controversies.
At a more practical level, writing has long been an avenue for growth, catharsis and healing. A myriad of human emotions from grief, joy, even anger seemingly make more sense when expressed in various literary channels. Many people who find themselves unable to express what they think or feel in speech often find themselves able to write up a storm, pouring out their hearts and souls on paper whether their thoughts are long and well-thought out, written in elegant calligraphy or hasty and vacillating, written in ugly scrawls.
However, good writers seem to be a dying breed, soon to join the dinosaurs in the annals of the extinct. Whatever the reason, be it due to the inability to write past life’s many distractions, the infamous writer’s block, or the growing apathy in the race toward automation, writing has become a tedious effort in an era of fast food and instant coffee.
It is in this light that this study seeks to determine whether common errors in writing of BSN freshmen students as to task completion, comprehensibility, level of discourse, vocabulary, language control and mechanics and degree of seriousness of the problems encountered in composition writing are affected by factors such as gender, age, grade in Communication Arts I, score in English in the Proficiency Test administered by the Guidance Office, ethnic affiliation, religious affiliation, mother’s occupation, mother’s educational attainment, father’s occupation, father’s educational attainment, monthly income of the family, print and electronic materials at home, language spoken at home and type of school graduated from.

Research Problem
This study aimed to determine the common errors in composition writing of BSN Freshmen students of Aldersgate College SY 2007 – 2008 as a basis for designing a module for writing skills improvement.
It also aimed to answer the following questions:

1. What is the profile of the BSN freshmen students of SY 2007 – 2008 as to:

1.1 gender

1.2 age

1.3 ethnic affiliation

1.4 religious affiliation

1.5 grade in Communication Arts I

1.6 score in the English Proficiency Tests administered by the
Guidance Office

1.7 mother’s occupation

1.8 mother’s educational attainment

1.9 father’s occupation

1.10 father’s educational attainment

1.11 monthly income of the family

1.12 print and electronic materials at home

1.13 language spoken at home

1.14 type of high school from which the respondents graduated

2. What is the level of writing performance of the BSN freshmen students according to:

2.1 the different ratings made by four Aldersgate English instructors using both the analytic and holistic scales as to:

2.1.1 task completion

2.1.2 comprehensibility

2.1.3 level of discourse

2.1.4 vocabulary

2.1.5 language control

2.1.6 mechanics

2.1.7 the Error Density Index

3. What are the common errors in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students?

4. What is the degree of seriousness of the problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students as to the type of high school from which the respondents graduated:

4.1 public school

4.2 private school

5. Is there any significant difference on the degree of seriousness of the problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students as to the type of high school from which the respondents graduated?

6. Is there any significant relationship between the degree of seriousness of the problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students of SY 2007 -2008 when grouped according to the profile variables?

Respondents of the Study
The respondents of this study were Bachelor of Science in Nursing freshmen students enrolled during the school year 2007 -2008.

There are 65 students officially enrolled freshmen students in the College of Medical Sciences taking up Bachelor of Science in Nursing, 20 of which are males and 45 are females. This study utilized 55 respondents.
Below is a table showing the respondents’ distribution as to gender.

Table 1

Frequency and Distribution of Respondents

Number of Respondents as to Gender Frequency Percentage
Male 13 23.64%
Female 42 76.36%
Total 55 100

Statistical Treatment of the Data
The following statistical treatments were used in the study:

1. For the profile of the BSN freshmen students as to gender, age, grade point average in English, score in English in the Proficiency Test administered by the Guidance Office, ethnic affiliation, religious affiliation, mother’s occupation, mother’s educational attainment, father’s occupation, father’s educational attainment, monthly income of the family, print and electronic materials at home, language spoken at home and type of  high school graduated from, Frequency Distribution, Percentage and Ranking were used. Mean was used for age.

2. To determine the level of writing performance of the BSN freshmen students as to:
a. task completion, comprehensibility, level of discourse, vocabulary, language control and mechanics, the Weighted Mean of different ratings made by four Aldergsate College instructors using both the analytic and holistic scales was taken.

b. errors in writing, Error Density Index and Ranking were used.

3. To determine the common errors in composition writing of the BSN freshmen, Frequency Distribution, Percentage and Ranking were used.

4. To determine the degree of seriousness of the problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students, Frequency Distribution, Percentage and Ranking were used.

5. To determine if there is any significant difference on the seriousness of  problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students as to the type of school they graduated whether public or private school, Mean and One – Way Analysis of Variance were used.

6. To determine if there is any significant relationship between the problems in composition writing of the BSN freshmen students according to the following variables: gender, age, grade point average in English, score in English in the Proficiency Test administered by the Guidance Office, ethnic affiliation, religious affiliation, mother’s occupation, mother’s educational attainment, father’s occupation, father’s educational attainment, monthly income of the family, print and electronic materials at home, language spoken at home Pearson Product Moment Coefficient of Correlation was used.

Findings

1. Profile of the Respondents

Gender
Of the 55 respondents, 13 or 23.64 percent are males and 42 or 76.36 percent are females. This shows that there are more female nursing freshmen students than male nursing freshmen students.

Age
The BSN freshmen respondents have a mean age of 17.05. This reveals that most of the BSN freshmen respondents are within the normal age range of first year college students.

Grade in Communication Arts I

The mean grade of the BSN freshmen respondents is 2.55. This is translated to a score between 80 and 84.

English Score in the Proficiency Test Administered by the Guidance Office

The mean score is 51.64 which can be interpreted as average. Of the 55 respondents, 25 or 45.45 percent scored lower than half of the test while 30 or 54.55 percent scored higher than half of the test.

Ethnic Affiliation
Of the 55 respondents, 24 or 43.64 percent are Tagalogs, they are followed by the Ilocanos at 13 or 23.64, 8 or 14.55 percent are a mixture of Tagalog and Ilocano, 4 or 7.27 are Ifugaos, 2 or 3.64 percent are a mixture of Tagalog and Gaddang. The majority of the respondents are Tagalogs.

Religious Affiliation

Of the 55 respondents, 33 or 60 percent are Roman Catholics, 9 or 16.36 percent are Methodists, 7 or 12.73 belong to the Born Again and 3 or 5.45 percent are members of the Iglesia ni Cristo. Other religious affiliations include Espiritista, Church of Christ and Evangelicals with 1 respondent each sharing equal percentage of 1.82 percent.

Mother’s Occupation

Of the 55 respondents, 16 or 29.09 percent have mothers working as housekeepers, 9 or 16.6 percent are into business, 7 or 12.73 percent have mothers working as overseas Filipino workers, the same number goes to those who are teaching and also for those who are unemployed, 3 or 5.45 percent are into farming. Forty seven (47) or 85.45 percent of the respondents’ mothers are employed whereas only 7 or 12.73 percent are unemployed.

Mother’s Educational Attainment

Of the 55 respondents, 21 or 38.18 percent have mothers who are college graduates, 15 or 27.27 percent who are high school graduates, 11 or 20 percent who are college undergraduates, 3 or 5.45 percent who are high school undergraduates, 2 or 3.64 who are elementary graduates. The same number goes to those who have mothers who have reached post-graduate level. This shows that majority of the mothers of the BSN freshmen respondents are college graduates, the number of college graduates being 21 or 38.18 percent.

Father’s Occupation
Of the 55 respondents, 20 or 36.36 percent have fathers who are into farming, 7 or 12.73 percent are into business, 5 or 9.09 are into driving, the same number goes for those who are working as overseas Filipino workers, 4 or 7.27 percent are into teaching. The same number goes for those who are unemployed. This shows that 47 or 85.45 percent of the respondents’ fathers are employed while only 4 or 7.27 percent are unemployed.

Father’s Educational Attainment
Of the 55 respondents, 16 or 29.09 percent of the respondents’ fathers are college graduates. The same number goes to those who are high school graduates while 11 or 20 percent are college undergraduates, 5 or 9.09 percent are elementary graduates. The same number goes to those are high school undergraduates and 2 or 3.64 are graduates of a technical – vocational course. This shows that there is an equal number of fathers who are college graduates and those who graduated from high school.
Further, the percentage of fathers who are college graduates which is at 29.09 percent is lower than the percentage of mothers who are college graduates which is at 38.18 percent.
Monthly Family Income
Of the 55 respondents, 18 or 32.73 percent receive a monthly income between 8,000 and 11,000 thousand pesos, 13 or 23.64 percent receive a monthly income which is below 5,000 thousand pesos, 8 or 14.55 percent receive a monthly income between 5,000 and 7,000 thousand pesos, the same number goes for those who receive a monthly income between 15,000 and 19,000 thousand pesos. Only 3 or 5.45 percent receive a monthly salary between 20,000 thousand pesos and above.
Since the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) set the annual per capita poverty threshold in areas outside the National Capital Region (NCR) at Php 228.00 per day (IBON E Media), data reveal that 21 or 38.19 percent of the respondents receive a monthly income below this threshold while 34 or 62.82 percent of the respondents receive a monthly income above this threshold.
Multi-Media Materials Available at Home
Of the 55 respondents, 54 or 98.18 percent have print media available at home. This includes respondents who have books which is at 50 or 90.91 percent, educational journals at 26 or 47.27 percent, magazines at 40 or 72.73 percent and newspapers at 34 or 61.82 percent. Furthermore, all of the 55 respondents or 100 percent have non-print media available at home. This includes computers with internet at 5 or 9.09 percent, computer without internet at 10 or 18.18 percent, electronic learning packages at 13 or 23.64 percent, radios at 51 or 92.73 percent and television sets at 53 or 96.36 percent. The data gathered show that multi-media materials are readily available to the BSN freshmen respondents.

Language Spoken at Home

Of the 55 respondents, 16 or 29.09 percent speak Ilocano at home, 14 or 25.45 percent speak a mixture of Tagalog and Ilocano, 12 or 21.82 speak Tagalog, 4 or 7.27 percent speak a mixture of English, Tagalog and Ilocano and 2 or 3.64 percent speak a mixture of English, Tagalog and Gaddang. The information shows that there are two major languages spoken by the respondents. These languages are Ilocano and Tagalog.

High School From Which the Respondents Graduated
Of the 55 respondents, 39 or 70.91 percent graduated from public high schools while 16 or 29.09 percent graduated from private high schools.This shows that there are more respondents who are graduates of public high schools than those who graduated from private high schools.

2. Level of Writing Performance

2.1 According to Ratings Made by Four Aldersgate College Instructors as to:

Analytic Rating

Task Completion

Task completion has a weighted mean of 2.85. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Comprehensibility
Comprehensibility has a weighted mean of 2.45. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Level of Discourse

Level of Discourse has a weighted mean of 2.24. Four Aldersgate College English  instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Vocabulary
Vocabulary has a weighted mean of 2.13. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.
Language Control
Language control has a weighted mean of 2.02. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Mechanics

Mechanics has a weighted mean of 1.95. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as does not meet expectations.

Holistic Rating

Task Completion

Task completion has a weighted mean of 79.28. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Comprehensibility
Comprehensibility has a weighted mean of 76.22. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Level of Discourse
Level of discourse has a weighted mean of 74.21 Four Aldersgate College Englsih instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Vocabulary
Vocabulary has a weighted mean of 73.59. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as almost meets expectations.

Language Control
Language control has a weighted mean of 72.40. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as does not meet expectations.

Mechanics

Mechanics has a weighted mean of 71.75. Four Aldersgate College English instructors rated the respondents’ essays as does not meet expectations.

2.2 According to the Error Density Index

The BSN freshmen respondents wrote an average of 97.55 words and 5.45 sentences in composition writing. They also committed an average of 18.87 errors, having an error density index of 4.70, which is high considering that scores should be close to or near zero. This also indicates that for every 97.55 words, the respondents commit 19.34 percent error. In terms of sentences, for every 5.45 sentences, 3.46 errors are committed.

3. Common Errors in Composition Writing of BSN Freshmen Students

Results show that the most common error committed is on tense and aspect with 321 or 30.92 percent. This is followed by type style which is at 140 or 13.49 percent, the use of punctuations at 125 or 12.04 percent, incomplete construction at 54 or 5.20 percent, the use of prepositions at 49 or 4.72 percent, the use of determiners at 41 or 3.95 percent and vagueness and ambiguity in construction at 33 or 3.18 percent. A total of 28 or 2.70 percent errors in reference of pronouns and coordination were made.

4. Degree of Seriousness of the Problems in Composition Writing of BSN Freshmen Students as to the type of high school graduated from

4.1 From the data, it can be seen that the respondents who graduated from public high schools perceived all of the problems given to be slightly serious. Students from public schools added other problems such as difficult topic and grammar. These problems were perceived to be not a problem.

4.2 Respondents who graduated from private high schools perceived all the problems given to be slightly serious.

4.2.1 effect of bilingualism in school

4.2.2 influence of vernacular at home

4.2.3 insufficient practice

4.2.4 lack of direct teaching

4.2.5 lack of motivation and interest in the use of the
language

4.2.6 lack of supervision of the teacher

4.2.7 lack of teaching aids

4.2.8 own carelessness

4.2.9 poor English background

4.2.10 poor mastery of language patterns

4.2.11poor reading habits

5. Significant Difference in the Seriousness of Problems in Composition Writing of BSN Freshmen Students as to the Type of School Graduated From Whether Public or Private
There is no significant difference in the seriousness of problems in composition writing of BSN freshmen students as to the type of school graduated from whether public or private. This indicates that students from both public and private schools have similar levels in writing proficiency and have the same perceptions regarding the degree of seriousness of problems in composition writing. They perceived the problems enumerated as slightly serious. While some respondents added other problems such as grammar and topic, these were perceived as not a problem.

6. Significant Relationship Between the Problems in Composition Writing of the BSN Freshmen Students According to the following variables: gender, age, grade in Communication Arts I, score in English in the Proficiency Test administered by the Guidance Office, ethnic affiliation, religious affiliation, mother’s occupation, mother’s educational attainment, father’s occupation, father’s educational attainment, monthly income of the family, print and electronic materials at home, language spoken at home
Results of the study show that among all the variables, only the respondents’ score in English in the Proficiency Test administered by the Guidance Office exhibited a significant relationship with the problems in composition writing. The rest of the variables, gender, age, grade in Communication Arts I, ethnic affiliation, religious affiliation, mother’s occupation, mother’s educational attainment, father’s occupation, father’s educational attainment, monthly income of the family, print and electronic materials at home and language spoken at home showed no significant relationship with the problems in composition writing.

Recommendations
In the light of the findings and conclusions of the study, the following are recommended:

1. For Communication Arts teachers to continue to facilitate and enrich learning in composition writing and guide students in the accomplishment of assigned tasks specially in the areas of task completion, comprehensibility, level of discourse, vocabulary, language control and mechanics.

2. For Communication Arts teachers to conduct refresher lessons in basic grammar and provide more student – based activities to ensure that students learn both the principles and their application in the writing tasks.

3. For Communication Arts teachers, other faculty members, the administration to look into lessening the factors that negatively affect the acquisition of the English language and increasing the opportunities for learning English. These include:

3.1 increasing the students desire to learn the language by providing sufficient, current and relevant aids for learning
3.2 inculcating the need to learn the English language as the world becomes more global crossing borders, cultures, governments, institutions and corporations from around the world
3.3 providing avenues for the students to freely express themselves in English such as public speeches, debates, poetry reading, drama clubs and the like

4. To address the problem in composition writing on:

4.1 the effect of bilingualism in school, for the school to have a stricter policy on the use of English in the campus
4.2 the influence of vernacular at home,  for government and non-government institutions to make materials for English learning such as books, magazines, newspapers, educational journals, cassettes and video compact discs  readily available to students through public libraries or donations to schools
4.3 insufficient practice, lack of direct teaching, lack of motivation and interest in the use of the language, lack of supervision, lack of teaching aids, for teachers to adopt various teaching styles and maximize the use of teaching aids to make learning an effective and enjoyable process and to practice positive ways of providing correction to prevent students from fearing embarrassment and avoiding opportunities that would otherwise aid their learning
5. Future studies may be conducted looking into the other possible variables that may have a significant relationship with problems in composition writing and other methods of determining the levels of writing proficiency.

The Relationship between the Learning Styles of First Year College Students and the Teaching Styles of their Instructors/Professors at Aldersgate College: An Analysis

Background of the Study

The teaching atmosphere of today’s classroom can no longer be viewed in the same way it was centuries ago when students were forced to sit down and listen to the teacher with the fear of getting punished should they fail to do so. The use of lecture-discussion method in the teaching-learning process is no longer sufficient to bring about an efficient outcome. New theories on classroom management have been institutionalized that gradually replaced the traditional theory counted upon by educators and curriculum developers in earlier educational systems.  Whether there had been improvement done to the existing system, teachers in the educational system have to cope with whatever innovations that are introduced in their desire to change what they consider underachievement. Too many teaching techniques and strategies are being introduced each year but very few can be adaptive to the changing learning needs of the students. Some teachers sometimes fail to consider that as students in a class look differently they also think and react in their own distinct manner. Teachers need to reflect that the uniqueness in personality, diversity in strengths and disparity in motivation of every student can bring about incongruity in their responses and reactions to instructional approaches and systems. Probably the most important aspect to get at learning is the idea of challenging all learners at their level instead of giving more work to those who learn the concept more quickly. This would require assessing the students learning styles should there be a need to differentiate classroom work.  Learning styles has been acknowledged as a justification to the perception that students achieve differently in class. A theory which supports this concept of students learning differently is Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.  There are numerous ways in which students will learn best and these can be identified if educators will give consideration to the weaknesses and strengths of the learners.

An effort to get better in terms of the quality of the teacher’s teaching style should be instigated, one which is rooted on the awareness of the learning needs of the students.  It is the undertaking of every teacher to determine the basis of students having different learning styles.  Awareness of the students’ learning styles will help teachers devise teaching methods that harmonize with these needs. Trying to match what students are actually doing as closely as possible with what they like doing and what they are good at doing may be advantageous for individuals to be well-rounded.  A mismatch of students’ learning needs and the teachers’ way of delivering the concepts may likewise be a factor in the poor performance of students.

Concerned with the problems faced by teachers interested to use other teaching techniques and methodologies which are more responsive to students’ need and motivated by the desire to effect a better transfer of learning, the researcher believes that individualized instruction promotes competency and proficiency in the learning process even with minimum direction of a teacher since much of the actual adaptation activities take place outside the teacher’s supervision. It is in this regard that we consider individual learning styles to improve the way we teach English Communication Arts in the academic setting.  Doing so will cause some challenges in innovating activities that will accommodate every student’s learning needs and abilities. The effort will create an improved learning environment for students where they can improve their study habits, attitudes and behavior, and eventually progress in the academic performance of even the underachievers in the classroom.

The assumption that students’ learning styles and their instructors/professors’ teaching styles have a major connection in the students’ performance in the classroom is the motivating factor for the researcher to conduct this study entitled: The Relationship Between the Learning Styles of the First Year College Students and the Teaching Styles of their Instructors/Professors at Aldersgate College: An Analysis.

Download File

SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS – BARANGAY CALAOCAN KABUHAYAN, KALUSUGAN AT TEKNOLOHIYA PARA SA KAUNLARAN OUTREACH PROGRAM

RATIONALE:

            The School of Informatics has a vital role to reach out to the community and realizes its goals and objectives through the Outreach or Extension Program.  Its social relevance is evident through the social services that are extended to the community. 

                To realize the goals and objectives of its Outreach Program, the School of Informatics decided to adopt Barangay Calaocan in Quezon, Nueva Vizcaya, a joint venture with Aldersgate Christian Child Center (ACCC) as its beneficiary.  The program started with the planning phase in order to come up with appropriate actions. Fifty five (55) families were identified and listed as beneficiaries of the program.  The participants in the extension program composed of the faculty and students conducted a survey to identify the problems of the barangay folks. The identified problems of the beneficiaries of ACCC and Barangay Calaocan served as basis for the faculty and students to determine the components of the Outreach Program and design the system of implementing the program.  These problems  had been solved through capability building, computer literacy, livelihood programs or projects, entrepreneurship, health services and environmental concern.   Resources were generated to support the implementation of what had been planned. In the real sense of the word service, many people with generous hearts who were willing to share their resources and who care enough to support others were tapped.

Some students and faculty of the School of Informatics have participated in a culminating activity that was undertaken. This activity somehow had touched the hearts and minds of the beneficiaries while at the same time encouraged the students and faculty to reinforce their willpower to serve and love their fellowmen.

The School of Informatics believes in the spirit of service to fellowmen as realization of the objectives of Aldersgate College such as Academic Excellence, Social Relevance and Spiritual Nurture.  There is a strong conviction that through the Barangay Calaocan Kabuhayan, Kalusugan at Teknolohiya Para Sa Kaunlaran Outreach Program, these institutional goals will be achieved.  

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES:

 

                The School of Informatics, through its Outreach Program aims:

  1. To develop the people in the community into a more productive, self-sufficient and responsible citizens.
  2. To provide the beneficiaries community access to computer literacy through the conduct of information technology trainings.
  3. To conduct livelihood trainings to the program beneficiaries as a means of earning a living.
  4. To encourage the program beneficiaries and other residents of the barangay to initiate entrepreneurial activities to augment their income after undergoing series of trainings.
  5. To integrate nutrition and other allied health services for a healthy living.
  6. To motivate the people in the barangay to be conscious about the preservation of the environment.
  7. To strengthen linkages between the school, the community, the government and other supporting agencies.

 

PROGRAM BENEFICIARIES:

 

  • 55 families of Barangay Calaocan, Quezon, Nueva Vizcaya

 

PROGRAM COMPONENTS AND LINKAGES:

 

Program Components Linkages
1. Capability Building and Development AC-CREATE, CACENCOR Programme, Provincial and Municipal Government
2. Computer Literacy

  • Computer Training, IT Services
ACI, ACGOC, Hewlett Packard, Cyber City, UPITTC, PCS, JPCS, JEDI
3. Livelihood Training

  • Food Processing, Handicrafts,

Entrepreneurship

AC-CREATE, DTI, TESDA, School of Hospitality Management, FULLER LIFE, AVON
4. Nutrition and Allied Health Services

  • Feeding Program, Medical and Dental Health Services (thru medical mission, etc.)
School of Hospitality Management, School of Medical Sciences, Veterans Regional Hospital, Quezon Rural Health Unit, Greenwich and  Chowking
5. Environmental Preservation and Protection

  • Tree Planting, Proper Wastes Disposal or Wastes Management
Provincial and Municipal Government, DENR, AC-CREATE, and  School of Hospitality Management

 

POLICIES AND STRATEGIES:

                In the realization of the goals and objectives of the institution through the School of Informatics Outreach Program, the following policies and strategies will be used to guide the operations:

  1. Development a self-sustaining community through an enhanced capability building program and development.
  2. Providing community access to computer literacy for the beneficiaries who are unable to have opportunities for free IT services. 
  3. Conduct and facilitation of livelihood trainings via consultation with experts of any required technology.
  4. Integration of nutrition and other allied health services that are critical to survival and development by using inter-agency but community-based approach.
  5. Advocacy and motivation concerning environmental preservation and protection.
  6. Strengthening of linkages between the school, community, government and other supporting agencies.

 

PROJECT MANAGEMENT:

  1. A.      Program Director 
Ms. Carmencita G. Mendoza, ACCC Superintendent 
  1. Program Overall Coordinator

           Officer-In-Charge                       

Mr. Ray L. Anquiliano (on-leave)Mr. Alfred Benson C. Co            
  1. Program Components
 
Component Persons Involved
  1. Capability Building Program
Mr. Alfred Benson C. CoMr. Ray L. Anquiliano                                          Dr. Romeo M. Bicad, DeanMr. Fernando S. AgraanMrs. Sharon Joy D. Cabanlong
  1.  Computer Training Program
Mr. Marlou Felix S. Cunanan III                                                                                Mrs. Sharon Joy D. CabanlongMr. Luther King A. Tambaoan Mr. Alfred Benson C. CoMr. Pink Euria L. Montano
  1. Livelihood Training
Dr. Romeo M. Bicad, DeanMrs. Sharon Joy D. CabanlongMs. Cyrine Fae B. CawagdanMs. Carmencita G. Mendoza
  1.  Nutrition and Health Allied Services
Ms. Bernadette Anne R. dela CruzDr. Romeo M. Bicad, DeanMr. Ray L. Anquiliano
  1.  Environmental Preservation & Protection
Dr. Romeo M. Bicad, DeanMr. Fernando S. AgraanMr. Ray L. AnquilianoMs. Carmencita G. Mendoza                                                         
  1. Consultants
Dr. Junifen F. Gauuan, AC PresidentMrs. Prescilla Esperanza A. Soriano, Sr. Executive Asst. for Education